Editorial

John Kerry’s Challenges

The connotations of Mr. Kerry’s nomination as the Secretary of State reflect a challenging time ahead for the US foreign policy. After serving nearly three decades on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, a highly respected John Kerry will certainly face the grave issue of Iran’s nuclear program, troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, China, Pakistan, and if all the negotiations fail, the dangers of US/Israel attack on Iran. Despite the fact that Mr. Kerry 69 would bring very deep experience and to the job, there is every reason to believe that the world will have “very White House-centric foreign policy”. In his remarks, president Obama praised Mr. Kerry, and said, that “in a sense, John’s life has prepared him for this role”.

It remains to be seen that how Mr. Kerry “is going to have to show his loyalty and willingness to work within the Obama system”, because in contrast to Mrs. Clinton, Mr. Kerry speaks with authority on arms reduction treaty with Russia, and hence the question whether he will be as aggressive as President Obama expects to be –defending human rights diplomacy. “The easiest model to see developing is one in which Kerry is on the road a lot, interfacing with foreign leaders, but the decision-making is done at the White House,” said Elliott Abrams, who held foreign-policy posts in the administrations of Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush (writes the New York Times).

But is Mr. Kerry tough enough to convince President Karzai to abandon his close circle, which allegedly involved in corruption and cronyism. The situation in Egypt, peace between Israel and Palestine, all are on the table except the constructive US engagement in a permanent settlement of the Middle East conflict. The Syrian question it is understood will remain at the top priority of US foreign policy.

For Mr. Kerry, it is also an ideal and lifetime achievement award. His external and internal influences would help him coin his role. “John was someone who from an early age dreamed of being president,” said Jim Gomes, a former chief of staff to Mr. Kerry. “As someone who grew up in a Foreign Service family, who testified before Senate Foreign Relations after coming home from Vietnam and who wanted to serve on Foreign Relations, this is a pretty terrific Plan B.”