Editorial

Egyptian court too asserts

Egypt’s highest court reflexed its muscles too and dropped a bomb shell on the political horizon by a major judgment. The court on Sunday ruled that the nation’s legislature and constitutional panel were illegally elected. The ruling by the Supreme Constitutional Court also says that the legislature’s upper house, the only one currently sitting, would not be dissolved until the Parliament’s lower chamber is elected later this year or early in 2014.

The Administrative Court still has to decide how to apply Sunday’s court verdict and whether it will have any impact on the assembly and the constitution that was ratified by a nationalreferendum in December 2012. Sunday’s rulings are the latest in a series of court orders challenging the legitimacy of the country’s top political institutions. The Islamist-dominated People’s Assembly (re-named as the House of Representatives) was dissolved in June 2012 following a court order, two days be-fore the presidential election runoff. Many post election watchers in Egypt were in fact apprehending such a turn of events by courts in Egypt.

The ruling virtually deepens the political instability that has gripped the country since the overthrow of authoritarian leader Hosni Mubarak two years ago. It is understood that the ruling could create deep trouble for President Morsi, who is ruling the country in line with the aspirations of the people. Regardless of their consequences on the ground, the ruling is likely to prolong the polarizing political transition that followed Mubarak’s overthrow. Rival political groups already disagree not just on policies and the future course of the nation but on the legitimacy of the basic institutions of government and the ruling has the danger to derail political and democratic process and could make the going difficult.

Courtesy: Pakistan Observer